IATEFL

Highlights from IATEFL 2017 Day 3-4

CaptureThe IATEFL annual conference is always a whirlwind of learning, discovery, meet ups and new connections.

Here are some highlights of what I saw on Days 3 and 4 of this year’s conference in Glasgow.

Jane Setter’s plenary, Where angels fear to tread: intonation in English language teaching, was the first plenary session to deal with pronunciation in IATEFL’s history. She dealt specifically with tonicity, which is an aspect of pronunciation that is important for inteligibility, teachable (with training), and learnable. It’s also part of the English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) set of core features. This was also the first IATEFL presentation I’ve been to, plenary or otherwise, that had us doing intonation-themed karaoke before noon, which gave it a grade of A+ in my books.

I usually try to catch up with as many of the Canadians at the IATEFL conference as possible. While I didn’t see everyone’s presentations, I managed to catch a few. Angelica Galante spoke on Integrating plurilingual practices in ELT in a superdiverse world, the theme of her doctoral research in multicultural and multilingual Toronto. She shared several examples of classroom activities to encourage translanguaging, code-switching, cross-cultural awareness and plurilingual identities in our students.

Another Canadian was Douglas Sewell spoke on Developing self-regulated learning skills through a restructured international foundations program,  and shared some of the practices they employ in the IFP at the University of Calgary.  An interesting aspect of their program is students not only learn about English, but they learn to use English; they not only learn about the norms of academic behaviour and expectations in the Canadian university environment, but they learn how to navigate those norms.

One of my favourite presentations of the whole conference was Alistair Roy’s talk, Small talk: supporting introversion in language learning. To be honest, this was a topic outside my usual wheelhouse, but this talk was brilliant. He gave lots of lots of practical suggestions on how to accommodate introverted learners in our classrooms, and recommended some further reading, Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World that Can’t Stop, by Susan Cain.

Advertisements

Discussion

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 76 other followers